Baking Powder Chicken Wings

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Baking powder chicken wings - chicken wing segments cooked using the baking powder method

If you’ve always wanted to know how to get the crispiest baked chicken wings possible, the answer is simple. Baking Powder. Now, you don’t need a lot, but a little goes a long way. You’ll be left with the crispiest chicken wings you’ve ever had from the oven. The best part? These baking powder chicken wings use no oil! In fact, there’s only 3 ingredients.

This recipe is more scientific than most, since we are looking for a chemical reaction between the baking powder and the chicken wings. This is why this method may seem unconventional, but works wonderfully. All you need to do is get a bunch of chicken wings and put them in a bowl.

Then you just put a bit of salt and the appropriate amount of baking powder directly into the bowl. I use 5 grams of baking powder per 15 wing segments. If you don’t segment your own chicken wings then it’s about a half of a teaspoon of baking powder for each whole wing.

NOTE: DO NOT USE BAKING POWDER WITH ALUMINUM! Some baking powders are made with aluminum and some people react negatively to the taste; it is better to just avoid using aluminum baking powder altogether.

putting the baking powder on the chicken wing segments

The baking part is extremely important to get right, as the first step is crucial to making these super crispy baking powder chicken wings. You have to preheat your oven to 120 Celsius, or about 250 Fahrenheit. Then lay each chicken wing or segment on an oven rack. When you place the rack in the oven make sure there is another oven tray beneath it to catch the fat drippings.

After ‘baking’ aka drying out in the oven for a half hour it’s time to crank up the heat. Raise that dial to 220 Celsius, or 425 Fahrenheit and let them really cook for 40 minutes. I cook them using the convection setting on my oven as I find the air blowing around makes them even crispier.

Cooking Tips And Tricks

Each chicken wing has 3 parts; the drumette, the wing, and the tip. Most people don’t eat the tip, but using this method you totally can. It crisps up kind of like a chip. If you prefer not to cook that part though it’s easy enough to leave out. Don’t discard them though since you can add them to other scraps for stock later.

If your chicken is wet make sure to dry it off before adding the salt and baking powder. I just give them a quick pat dry with some paper towels. As the salt works its magic you will see more liquid pool at the bottom of the bowl. This is good.

Make sure the collection tray beneath the rack is larger than the rack. Otherwise the drippings will fall to the bottom of the oven and become really hard to clean. These drippings should be saved and make a great fat for roast potatoes.

Can You Sauce Baking Powder Chicken Wings?

Absolutely. Just like with regular old fried chicken wings you can sauce ones using the baking powder method. After you pull them out of the oven add them to a large bowl with your desired sauce and give them all a toss!

baking powder method chicken wings for extra crispy chicken skin

Baking Powder Chicken Wings

The baking powder method for baked chicken wings will give you an extra crispy wing and is the only way you'll ever bake them again.
3.52 from 37 votes
Print Pin Rate
Course: Appetizer, Main Course, Main Dish, Side Dish, Snack
Cuisine: American
Keyword: Baked Chicken Wings, Baking Powder Chicken Wings
Prep Time: 5 minutes
Cook Time: 1 hour 10 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour 15 minutes
Servings: 10 chicken wings
Calories:
Cost: $3

Equipment

  • Oven Rack

Ingredients

  • 10 Chicken Wings segmented into tips, 'wing', and drumettes (total 30 pieces).
  • 2 tsp Baking Powder powder, not soda
  • 1 tsp Salt
  • 1 tsp Black Pepper freshly cracked (optional)

Instructions

  • After breaking down your chicken wings, put all the segments into a bowl. Add the baking powder and salt and give everything a good mix with your hands. You don't need the baking powder to coat every piece, but you want it evenly spread around all the pieces.
  • Preheat your oven to 120 Celsius or 250 Fahrenheit. Place the segments onto a baking rack not touching each other.
  • Place the tray into the oven and put another tray beneath it to catch the drippings. Bake for 30 minutes.
  • Raise the heat to 220 Celsius or 425 Fahrenheit and bake for another 40 minutes.
  • Remove the wings, sprinkle with pepper if you want, and serve hot.

Notes

These wings will hold for a week in the fridge, but may lose some of their crispiness because of moisture buildup. 
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Baking Powder Chicken Wings

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Note: Make sure you are using baking powder and not baking soda. Soda will definitely ruin your wings.

Prefer Thighs? Try My Maple Mustard Chicken Thighs With Mushrooms

Roasted Maple syrup and mustard chicken thighs with mushrooms

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23 thoughts on “Baking Powder Chicken Wings”

  • We cooked these tonight and were great. We have one of the original nuwave convection ovens that we used and they turned out fantastic. Thanks for the cooking tips. Paul

  • After reading the recipe I’m trying to decide if you mean you place the wings directly on the oven rack. That makes a huge mess, doesn’t it?

    • Yes you have to put them directly on the oven rack to maximize airflow. I do mention about putting a tray underneath the rack though to catch the drippings; to make cleanup easier you can line it with foil.

  • Would putting a wire rack on a baking sheet in a convection oven work? This way I can do 2 trays at once, one not get my actual oven racks greasy.

  • Also- anytime I need to coat meats with flour & seasonings I usually do the “ shake & bake” method, put everything into a plastic bag & shake it up. Any reason not to do this here?
    Put 10-15 pieces in at a time, Shake to coat , remove to a bowl until all are done, then place on my wire racks??

    • So I’ll answer both questions on this comment. I do believe a wire rack on top of a sheet will work since I sort of do that by placing a baking tray on another rack a few inches beneath the top rack with the wings. The main point is to get lots of airflow around the wings so some of the fat can render and drip down.

      I also think you can do shake and bake, but since there’s really so little salt and baking powder per amount of wings I just toss them in the bowl. Just personal preference, you should be able to coat the wings however you want as long as they have some time to air-dry before placing on the rack!

      Let me know how they turn out when you make them, I can add an amendment to the post if it works well with your variation 🙂

      • Thanks! Ill be doing them for Super Bowl on Sunday. I’ll report back.
        Also are there some other spices that would be complimentary to add to the baking powder & salt? Or do you think its batter to do them as is and use dips for the extra flavors?

        <y intention is to have some BBQ, Blue Cheese, Hot sauce and Ranch

        • I don’t add any spices to the chicken but I don’t think it would be an issue to do so. I just haven’t done it since I prefer to toss in sauces after they are done baking. I think your selection of dips for Super Bowl Sunday sounds great!

          Make sure to use aluminum free baking powder. I know I’ve said it in the recipe but I’d hate for you to make a bad batch. Only some people have a negative taste to baking powder with aluminum (kind of like how 10% of people can’t stand the taste of cilantro), but I think it’s better to avoid it all together.

  • I was thinking a little bit of garlic powder and perhaps some smoked paprika and oregano ,not that much would be nice.
    I have to check my baking powder. I didn’t know any food products would have aluminum in them on purpose…?

    • I’m not sure but I think it’s added as an anti-clumping thing, or maybe to make it super white. Either way it’s my understanding that it’s perfectly edible, just some people can actually taste it and find it off-putting.

      As per your seasonings I think they would be fine and taste great, although the oregano does worry me because of the long cooking time in dry heat. Burnt oregano can taste very bitter so I personally would leave that out (but I’ve never tried it so not 100% sure).

    • Rumford is probably the most popular if you are in America available at large grocers like Wal-Mart, Safeway, Vons etc, but there are also store named brands at Whole Foods or Trader Joes. Even if you find one that doesn’t advertise it as aluminum free it still might be as well, just check the ingredients list on the back to verify. I think these days most baking powder is aluminum free, but there are still some brands that haven’t changed. I didn’t even know this was an issue until I made this post and a commenter on Pinterest told me their wings tasted “tinny” and what’s the deal, so now I’ve updated my post just to be on the safe side.

  • I prefer dry rub seasonings (lemon pepper, garlic parm, etc). Normally I would toss them with those then bake/air fry in light oil. If I wanted to try this method, when would I toss them in the seasoning? Before or after?

    • Hmmm…I think powdered dry ingredients would be fine, but not things like dry herbs just because of the long time in the oven. But to be honest I’ve only ever used salt and baking powder first, and then tossed in a sauce like garlic parm or buffalo after they are done. If you want to give it a test I’d love to hear the results so I can amend the recipe notes! This recipe doesn’t call for any oil in the beginning because we want to dry out the skin of the wings and render as much subcutaneous fat as possible, but I think if you whisked the dry rub seasonings with a bit of oil and then brushed it on in the last 5 minutes of baking it would be fantastic.

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