Pork And Shrimp Shumai (Siu Mai) Dim Sum

Pork And Shrimp Shumai (Siu Mai) Dim Sum in a steamer basket with a side dipping sauce

Every visitor to Hong Kong or Southern China has to do a dim sum brunch at least once. This common activity with Chinese is a great way to spend time with family and friends, all while enjoying delicious food! One of the most popular dim sum dishes is this pork and shrimp shumai.

Pork and shrimp shumai is a combination of the two most popular varieties of shumai, pork, or shrimp. If you prefer one or the other than you can just stick with one meat. I love combining them like I do in my dim sum peppers but it is entirely up to you.

What Is Shumai?

Pork And Shrimp Shumai (Siu Mai) Dim Sum in a steamer basked topped with salmon caviar

Shumai, or siu mai, 烧卖, shui mei (seriously, there are a lot of ways to spell this dish) are open top steamed dumplings common at dim sum eateries. They are often filled with pork, shrimp, or a combination, and they are almost always topped with caviar.

While they look fancy and complicated, the only difficult part of making these pork and shrimp shumai was the folding technique. However I would suggest not being too particular about it and try to have fun – you will improve naturally the more you make these dumplings.

How To Make Pork And Shrimp Shumai Dim Sum

Pork And Shrimp Shumai (Siu Mai) Dim Sum ingredients on a table

The mixture for the insides of these dumplings is quite simple. It is almost all ingredients that you have in your pantry, or stuff easy to find at the grocery store. The one difficult item to find might be the MSG, but you are not obligated to use it; I just use it for authenticity and flavor.

Ingredients

250 grams Pork – ground

250 grams Shrimp – ground (if you don’t have a meat grinder you can try to do a very fine mince with a knife/cleaver)

2 tbsp Light Soy Sauce

2 tbsp Oyster Sauce

1-2 tsp Sesame Oil – I personally love sesame oil, but if you are not a fan you can skip it

1 tbsp Sugar

1 tsp MSG – this is a flavor enhancer which is basically just a super salt. It isn’t bad for you, that’s just an unfounded accusation.

2 tbsp Green Onion – chopped

1/2 tsp White Pepper

Caviar – to top. Most commonly used is crab roe, but I chose to use salmon caviar as it was more easily accessible to me.

Oil – optional, if you do not have steamer papers then brushing oil on the bamboo slats will help prevent the dim sum dumplings from sticking

25-30 Wonton Wrappers – store bought works absolutely fine here. Get circular ones, if you get square ones then use a ring mold or cookie cutter to make them into circles.

Making The Pork And Shrimp Shumai Filling

grinding shrimp in a SMEG meat grinder attachment

It’s very easy to find ground pork at the grocery store. However ground shrimp is pretty uncommon outside of Asia. In that case you’ll either need to use a meat grinder or do some knifework.

Pork And Shrimp Shumai filling ingredients in a bowl

Add all the ingredients except the caviar and oil to a bowl and mix everything together. I find using your hands is the best way to do this. You really want to mix quite a lot so the meat gets sticky and more paste-like.

filling the Pork And Shrimp Shumai with the knife method

Dip your wonton wrapper in water and place a heaping teaspoon of filling right in the middle. Press the filling out to the edges. Then use the back of a butter knife to pull up the sides as seen in the photo above. As you do this more and more you will get the hang of it.

pork and shrimp uncooked shumai on a floured surface

Place your completed shumai on a floured surface while you work on the rest. You can start steaming them as you make them, or just wait until you are all done before starting to steam them.

shumai dumplings in a steamer basket with a paper insert

Place the pork and shrimp shumai in a bamboo steamer, taking care not to let them touch. If you have a paper insert than use that so the dumplings do not stick.

bamboo double steamer basket on a pot on a range in a kitchen

Place the steamer basket on a pot of boiling water and let steam for 10 minutes. Then remove the basket (use mitts as the wood can be hot).

freshly steamed pork and shrimp shumai

The meat will look kind of gray/white with a pink tinge but this is exactly what you want. Naturally there won’t be any browning since you steamed the meat as opposed to frying or baking it.

pork and shrimp shumai in a bamboo steamer basked with a side of dipping sauce

Top the pork and shrimp shumai with a bit of caviar and serve alongside some dipping sauce. My dipping sauce is simple a 50/50 mix of soy sauce and vinegar, with a dash of sesame oil and some chili flakes.

Tips And Tricks

If you don’t want to use pork or shrimp, you can stick with just one meat. You can also use other meats although that will not be as authentic.

I highly recommend buying some paper inserts for your bamboo steamer basket, but in case you don’t have any, just brush the bamboo slats with neutral oil before placing on the uncooked shumai

Shumai, along with Har Gow and Char Siu Bao, are the three most famous dim sum dishes. If you go to Hong Kong or mainland Southern China then you absolutely have to try all three!

pork and shrimp shumai in a bamboo steamer basked with a side of dipping sauce

Pork And Shrimp Shumai (Siu Mai) Dim Sum

Shumai is one of the most popular dim sum dishes in Hong Kong and Southern China. This simple recipe will bring that authentic taste right to your kitchen at home.
5 from 1 vote
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Course: Dim Sum
Cuisine: Cantonese, Chinese, Hong Kong
Keyword: Dim Sum, Dumplings, Pork, Seafood, Shellfish, Steamed
Prep Time: 30 minutes
Cook Time: 30 minutes
Total Time: 1 hour
Servings: 30 dumplings
Calories: 75kcal
Cost: $10

Equipment

  • 1 Bamboo Steamer Basket | can also use metal or paper, but bamboo is traditional

Ingredients

  • 250 grams Pork ground
  • 250 grams Shrimp ground, if you don't have a meat grinder you can try to do a very fine mince with a knife/cleaver
  • 2 tbsp Light Soy Sauce
  • 2 tbsp Oyster Sauce
  • 1-2 tsp Sesame Oil I personally love sesame oil but if you are not a fan you can skip it
  • 1 tbsp Sugar
  • 1 tsp MSG this is a flavor enhancer which is basically just a super salt. It isn't bad for you that's just an unfounded accusation.
  • 2 tbsp Green Onion chopped
  • 1/2 tsp White Pepper
  • Caviar to top. Most commonly used is crab roe but I chose to use salmon caviar as it was more easily accessible to me.
  • Oil optional, if you do not have steamer papers then brushing oil on the bamboo slats will help prevent the dim sum dumplings from sticking
  • 25-30 Wonton Wrappers store bought works absolutely fine here. Get circular ones if you get square ones then use a ring mold or cookie cutter to make them into circles.
  • Potato Starch optional, will most likely be needed if your shrimp or pork is 'watery'

Instructions

  • Use a meat grinder or a knife to grind your shrimp (and pork if needed)
  • Add all the ingredients to a bowl except the caviar and oil and wonton wrappers. Mix thoroughly with your hands until you form a sticky-tacky paste. If the mix is too wet then add some potato starch until it gets thicker and stickier. Just add a teaspoon at a time until desired consistency
  • Dip the wonton wrapper in water and place a heaping teaspoon of filling right in the middle. Spread out to the edges. Use the back of a butter knife to pull up the sides and press into the center to form the famous shumai open top look (see photos in article).
  • Place the shumai on a floured surface as you work on making the rest of them.
  • Add the shumai to your steamer basket. Make sure they are not touching. Place on a pot of boiling water and let steam for 10 minutes.
    *Depending on how many or how large your steamer baskets are the total cooking can take anywhere from 10 minutes to an hour.
  • Remove from the pot and top with a bit of the caviar. Serve hot along with a dipping sauce of your choice.

Dipping Sauce Suggestion

  • In a bowl make a 50/50 mix of soy sauce and Chinese vinegar. Then add a dash of sesame oil and some red chili flakes to taste.

Nutrition

Calories: 75kcal
Did you make this?Mention @CookingToEntertain or tag #cookingtoentertain and let me know how it was!

Pork And Shrimp Shumai (Siu Mai) Dim Sum

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